Obama’s First Overexposed 100 Days: “I Have a Gift” (Yup: Ted Kennedy Gave Him a Dog)

News reports that a long time ago one Barack Obama told Harry Reid, “I have a gift…”

Everyone knows President Barack Obama can deliver a great speech, including the president himself, according to Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid.

The paperback version of Reid’s book, “The Good Fight,” is coming out May 5 with an epilogue called “The Obama Era.” Reid said he was impressed when Obama, then a freshman senator from Illinois, delivered a speech about President George W. Bush’s war policy.

Reid, D-Nev., writes: “‘That speech was phenomenal, Barack,’ I told him. And I will never forget his response. Without the barest hint of braggadocio or conceit, and with what I would describe as deep humility, he said quietly: ‘I have a gift, Harry.'”

A copy of the book’s 15-page epilogue was provided to The Associated Press.

Read the rest:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/
20090427/ap_on_go_pr_wh/u
s_reid_obama_3

Related:
How Bad Really is This Mexican Swine Flu?
.
Some Critical of Obama for “Hyping” Swine Flu; Shows Distrust of O’s Overwhelming News Dominance
.
Fox Will Not Air Obama “Press Conference” This Week; Obama’s Lust for Free TV Costs Networks Millions
.
 Obama’s 100 Days: $65 Billion in New Debt Each Day

*******************************

By George F. Will

A 19th-century historian called the Middle Ages “a thousand years without a bath.” That oversimplified somewhat, but was interestingly suggestive. So is the summation of Obama‘s opening sprint as 100 days without silence.

Ordinary politicians cannot comprehend that it is possible for the public to see and hear too much of them. In this sense, Obama is very ordinary. A few leaders of democracies have understood the importance of being economical with their demands for the public’s attention. Charles de Gaulle believed that remoteness nurtures a mystique that is an essential ingredient of leadership. Ronald Reagan, an actor, knew that the theatrical dimension of politics requires periodic absences of the star from center stage. He spent almost an eighth—a year—of his presidency at his ranch. But when he spoke, people listened. If Obama, constantly flitting here and there, continues to bombard the nation with his presence, he will learn how skillfully Americans wield the basic tool of modern happiness, the TV remote control with its mute button.

Calvin Coolidge, the last president with a proper sense of his office’s constitutional proportions, was known, not coincidentally, as Silent Cal. His reticence expressed an institutional modesty: “It is a great advantage to a President, and a major source of safety to the country, for him to know that he is not a great man.”

Read the rest:
http://www.newsweek.com/id/195076

http://michellemalkin.com/2009
/04/28/rush-is-wrong/

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: